Executive Processes

Previously, we have discussed Executive Functions as encompassing three main areas; inhibition, working memory and cognitive flexibility.  The reality is that these three functions do not work alone.  They compliment each other, thereby allowing us to perform higher level processes.  As a result, such processes are often referred to as Executive Processes and include processes such as planning, organising, prioritising, shifting, memorising and checking (Meltzer, 2010). We have previously discussed Executive Functions as encompassing three main areas; inhibition, working memory and cognitive flexibility.  The reality is that these three functions do not work alone.  They compliment each other, thereby allowing us to perform higher level processes.  As a result, these processes are often referred to as Executive Processes and include planning, organising, prioritising, shifting, memorising and checking (Meltzer, 2010).

These processes often need to be used together when we complete a complex task such as reading a long text, planning a project or having a discussion.  Difficulties in one or more of these areas, or functions leads to a feeling of being stuck and unable to move on.   Meltzer (2010), described this as a “clogged funnel”, whereby a lack of flow in the processes causes a blockage.  This blockage may be interpreted as slowness, lack of interest or laziness, but in reality it is often an inability to efficiently deal with simultaneous sources of input.